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Shoulder/chest turn

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  • Shoulder/chest turn

    Anyone have any good checkpoints to make sure one is turning 90 degrees above the waist and 45 degrees below the waist?

  • #2
    Re: Shoulder/chest turn

    Agree with the shirt buttons.

    I like to have the feeling that I am basically turning my chest about my right hip so that at the end of the backswing, the right hip will be not quite centred between the shoulders, but pretty close to it. To do this, I'm really trying to keep the right leg / hip static.

    Of course, the hips do turn somewhat but not excessively (less than 45%, I think, in my case). I then get the feeling of some resistance in the right side.

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    • #3
      Re: Shoulder/chest turn

      CMAYS comment regarding weight shift to right leg very interesting.How many times have we been told not to sway during backswing , this usually results in a reverse pivot. It is possible to have the right leg perpindicular and not move the upper body.

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      • #4
        Re: Shoulder/chest turn

        The right leg stays flexed but able to support the weight without collapsing or leaning-no reverse pivot if this is done properly. If the leg doesn't fully support the weight, reverse pivot.
        Originally posted by bampot View Post
        CMAYS comment regarding weight shift to right leg very interesting.How many times have we been told not to sway during backswing , this usually results in a reverse pivot. It is possible to have the right leg perpindicular and not move the upper body.

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        • #5
          Re: Shoulder/chest turn

          Thanks for the compliment but as we get older being able to stay flexible is a challenge. I do daily stretches(I know it doesn't sound strenous but it is because each stretch is held for up to 4 minutes per set). Maintaining the legs and hip action allow the upper body to turn.
          Age can be beat if one stays flexible. The days of 2 hours lifting weights in the gym are over for me.

          Originally posted by cmays View Post
          Takinitdeep has the hip action working, he is a very advance golfer.

          If you can take and face your palms towards each other, thumbs up, fingers out, palms spaced about a foot apart from each other and bring the arms and hands back in the backswing and if you are a right hander having the chest/buttons facing behind you to the right side, have that chest turned and from the top of the backswing bring the arms and hands slowly back down you will see how the arms drop, then at a certain point the left arm starts to come out and the left hand goes into rotation.

          Each person has that transition slot and if they use it to their advantage, it makes the game easier.

          Also notice what the back shoulder is doing when the arms and hands drop.

          People rush the downswing process and they loose that transition that should occur.

          You can not do the arm and hand drill to often.

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          • #6
            Re: Shoulder/chest turn

            Originally posted by takinitdeep View Post
            Age can be beat if one stays flexible. The days of 2 hours lifting weights in the gym are over for me.
            Surprisingly, it has been shown that the key to muscular flexibility is strength. A strong muscle is a flexible muscle. When Olympic athletes were tested for flexibility, the most flexible turned out to be the gymnasts (no surprise there) and the power lifters (big surprise there). The best way to stay flexible is to stay strong. What changes as we age, however, is our recovery rate. Those two hours sessions with the weights were actually never that productive. Despite lots of attempts, it has yet to be shown scientifically that high-volume training (multiple sets) is more effective than single sets at high intensity, but when we're young we can tolerate the high-volume approach. As we age, it becomes increasingly counter-productive; we have to train smarter.

            Most of us (pointing at self here) become more sedentary as the years go by, and our core muscles become weaker--lower back and abdomen. And those are the very muscles needed to make a good turn. So even though I'll be the first to admit that strengthening core muscles is tedious, it does make a big difference.

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            • #7
              Re: Shoulder/chest turn

              30 lbs. of muscle in 2 years begs to differ with you re: two hours per day lifting weights. Now in my 60's I still maintain great musclature and actually hit the ball further and better than in my younger days.
              Strength and flexibility training are the keys and best obtained by consulting professionals not some db wannabees.
              Originally posted by ubizmo View Post
              Surprisingly, it has been shown that the key to muscular flexibility is strength. A strong muscle is a flexible muscle. When Olympic athletes were tested for flexibility, the most flexible turned out to be the gymnasts (no surprise there) and the power lifters (big surprise there). The best way to stay flexible is to stay strong. What changes as we age, however, is our recovery rate. Those two hours sessions with the weights were actually never that productive. Despite lots of attempts, it has yet to be shown scientifically that high-volume training (multiple sets) is more effective than single sets at high intensity, but when we're young we can tolerate the high-volume approach. As we age, it becomes increasingly counter-productive; we have to train smarter.

              Most of us (pointing at self here) become more sedentary as the years go by, and our core muscles become weaker--lower back and abdomen. And those are the very muscles needed to make a good turn. So even though I'll be the first to admit that strengthening core muscles is tedious, it does make a big difference.

              Comment

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