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Estimating Distance

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  • Estimating Distance

    Hi to All,

    As a newbie, I have question about estimating distance. The courses I play typically have a 150 yard marker in the form of a tree or shrub. Is this distance measured from the center of the green or from the edge of the green?
    Also, I've noticed that the pins are red, white, or blue on different greens for the same course. What's up with that, anything?

    Thanks in advance.

    Jack T.

  • #2
    Re: Estimating Distance

    Distances are to the center of the green.

    Red flag indicates the pin is at the front of the green, white is middle, blue is for the back pin placements.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Estimating Distance

      Originally posted by gord962
      Distances are to the center of the green.

      Red flag indicates the pin is at the front of the green, white is middle, blue is for the back pin placements.
      Man, I wish they would do that in Denmark.

      Best I've seen so far over here was a grid-layout on the scorecard, depicting 6 'zones' for every green, and then a sign at first tee telling that this days pin-position is "5".

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Estimating Distance

        Mox, are you crazy?

        I'd much prefer the map/pin method, as you get a better idea of what you're shooting to - especially on a long skinny green. If it's in the back, you know that you generally have another 10 yards to go to the flag (past middle).

        My course is even worse - red flag for the front half, yellow for the back. And the flag can be anywhere from 2 feet forward of center to the minimum distance from the fringe...

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Estimating Distance

          Originally posted by gord962 View Post
          Distances are to the center of the green.

          Red flag indicates the pin is at the front of the green, white is middle, blue is for the back pin placements.

          Here in Australia, you will generally be given pin placements in terms of its distance from both the front and right hand edges of the green.

          eg 20m on from the front & in 8m from the right.

          In line with this, most of the courses here measure their 150m markers (and also 100m & 200m in some cases) are to the front of the green.

          It is a trap for young players when the 150m markers are to the centre of a green, because, you then need to know how deep the green is in order to know how much to take off the 150m before you add on how far from the front of the green the pin placement is.

          Best advice I would offer would be to ask the question in the pro shop at your course before you head to the first tee.....


          Cheers

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Estimating Distance

            Best advice I would offer would be to ask the question in the pro shop at your course before you head to the first tee.....


            As to if the distance is to the center or front of the green, I have found that the 100, 150, 200 and 250 posts at public courses generally are measured to the centers of the greens, for the sake of convenience. I have to keep reminding my partners that a particular green may be over 30 yards deep and there could be a 3 club difference in club selection, depending on where the pin is. They never listen, they only look at the yardage of the posts, and as an example, they can't figure out why they hit so short on the green, when the pin is at the back.

            At private, tournament and resort courses, the sprinkler head yardages are to the front. That's why the pros and caddies look at the yardage to the front and look at the pin sheets to figure out the additional yardage to the pin.

            Ted

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Estimating Distance

              Originally posted by Scragger63 View Post

              It is a trap for young players when the 150m markers are to the centre of a green, because, you then need to know how deep the green is in order to know how much to take off the 150m before you add on how far from the front of the green the pin placement is.

              Irrespective of whether the marker is to the front or the middle I'm trying to discipline myself to go for the back of the green and rather than worrying too much about pin placement I'd recommend that any high handicappers do the same.

              If I hit the ball perfectly I'll be putting from the back, hit it not quite flush then from middle or front depending on how much distance I've lost.

              In our game (as a high capper) most greens are missed short, which is also where most of the trouble is, so ask yourself how many times are your irons hit not quite flush and apply the above to clubbing to centre or front.

              If your distance control and ball striking are consistent enough then choose which part of the green to go for depending on pin position and slopes; failing that then club up enough to give your self a chance of the next shot being with the flat stick.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Estimating Distance

                That's a good strategy on many courses Robin. My club's course has very long, narrow and undulating greens that are strongly guarded by steep sided bunkers, they normally have an apron of around 4 yards at the front that is cut a little longer than the green it's self (This apron is not the green so can be chipped from), I tend to play for the apron on longer shots where the actual pin placement is not clear, I find this leaves me a wide range of options to attack the hole.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Estimating Distance

                  bdbl and Brian,

                  I think the strategy for us mortals to generally go for the back of the greens is sound also.

                  Here's a related idea, as to how to play shots to the green when you know where the pins are.

                  The pros say when the pin is at the front, they would hit a higher shot, and when the pin is at the back they would take play a lower shot (more of a punch driving shot).

                  We may say...DUH, so isn't that common sense? Perhaps, but not necessarily for the reasons we have in mind.

                  The pros play the percentages, in case the shots do not come off precisely as they wanted it to (mishit, thin, fat).

                  In the case of the high shot to the front pin, if the ball ends up flying or running, at least it would not run too far to the back of the green, thereby leaving a potential three putt situation, particularly if the green slopes back to front. If the ball ends up short of the green, the ball would still be in position for an easy up and down chip or Texas wedge. The pros may not necessarily use this strategy, if there is a severely sloping false front which will run the ball a long distance back into the fairway, or if there is a bunker in front of the green.

                  The reverse applies to the low boring shot to the back pins. Again, there is allowance for a slightly mishit shot, which should still get the ball to the back portion of the green or just off it. A high shot, if mishit, will end up at the front of the green a good distance away from the pin, which is at the very back.

                  Ted

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Estimating Distance

                    Great idea Robin - and you touch on an important concept in club selection: Where is the trouble. On the course I've called 'home' since I started, while there may have been some trouble short, there is ALWAYS trouble long - either a thicket of trees, hazards, or OB on all holes.

                    I'm still working on figuring out how to figure out 'where to miss' especially laterally, but part of it comes from not having a 'miss' to count on.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Estimating Distance

                      Regardless of the distance, and how you manage your way around it, and the trouble spots, don't forget to factor in the terrain relative to the known distance. Is the green up hill, down hill, or a flat run from your approach shot position? The terrain will have you making adjustments in club selection. In other words (using a 100 yd marker) is it actually 100 yards to the green (flat run), a short 100 yards (down hill run), or a long 100 yards (up hill run). I see it alot where a player will be at a yard marker, pull out his/her club based on that marker, then wind up long, or short of that yardage. Alot of head scratching starts, and usually has a poor effect on their next approach shot. GJS

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Estimating Distance

                        Originally posted by GolfJunkieSr View Post
                        Regardless of the distance, and how you manage your way around it, and the trouble spots, don't forget to factor in the terrain relative to the known distance. Is the green up hill, down hill, or a flat run from your approach shot position? The terrain will have you making adjustments in club selection. In other words (using a 100 yd marker) is it actually 100 yards to the green (flat run), a short 100 yards (down hill run), or a long 100 yards (up hill run). I see it alot where a player will be at a yard marker, pull out his/her club based on that marker, then wind up long, or short of that yardage. Alot of head scratching starts, and usually has a poor effect on their next approach shot. GJS
                        It's frustrating that so much of golf is 'eyeballing' and learning as you play - as you say 100 yards isn't always 100 yards! I realise that physics can help, but really - what does 44 feet of elevation look like?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Estimating Distance

                          Originally posted by LowPost42 View Post
                          It's frustrating that so much of golf is 'eyeballing' and learning as you play - as you say 100 yards isn't always 100 yards! I realise that physics can help, but really - what does 44 feet of elevation look like?
                          Yes, this is an important factor in club selection. I find it is important to start with a clear picture in your minds-eye of what the trajectory shape will look like for a particular shot. Many golfers think of this as an arc or rainbow shape when in reality it is not, it is a hockey stick shape where it ascends on a steady slope then as momentum is lost it falls on a much steeper angle. When hitting to a green that is elevated above you it is important to consider that the ball will not create the full trajectory like when hitting to a level target, the ball will hit the ground earlier, so you must use a club that will produce suitable height and more length than the marker may suggest.

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